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. tonight, jim's got two exclusives. the ceos of nps pharma and exact sciences just ahead. >>> and later, king of the hill. they're the two top performers in the dow last year. but 2013 isn't big enough for both of them. with the big mortgage settlement behind them, could bank of america deposit returns for you this year, or should the housing rebound keep home depot in your sights? cramer decides. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail at jimcramercnbc.com or call 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on ev
important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
ensure that rules are based on good data and sound science. third, we are going to see -- you're going to see a significant respond to expand the expertise of our law firm, the national chamber litigation center. and in other areas of our institution in order to deal with expanding regulation. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory process. and we do that on a daily basis, but when rights have been trampled on, our regulators have overstepped their bounds, well, we will then just take necessary legal action. now let me turn to something we should all care about any very important way, that's immigration reform. america has grown because we have attracted and welcome some of the most talented and the hard-working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities. they invest and invent in our technological companies. they staff our hospitals. they care for our elderly and our young. they harvest our food and they serve in our armed forces. given are changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy. support our ret
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
that rejects maybe what might fit on a bumper sticker but is at least based in science. >> jennifer: so are you arguing that the smart initiatives that you are talking about are based in brain science or is it more in an economic pragmatic -- do you have more an economic or pragmatic take on it? >> i think it's both. i think we learned so much about marijuana today than the last 30 years. it's sort of ironic we have also seen the descendants of legalization. today's marijuana is not the marijuana of the wood stock days. it's five to seven times more potent. it also had less of other ingredients like cbd which actually don't make you high and what that does to the adolescent brain is startling. heavy persistent use leads to significant iq loss among young people. the british medical journal showed that marijuana intoxication doubles your car crash risk. so we just want to get the public health message out there for the american people to know about, since the only discussion seems to be bombarded with legalization and a promise of revenue, and getting rid of the
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
the star wars inspired weapon. but on a posting the science and space advisor wrote the u.s. does not support blowing up planets. he also calls with a waste of taxpayer money. >> #* >> your new miss america is miss new york! [applause] >> mallory hagan won the pageant last night. the panelingen was in vegas. she tap danced to win the prize. she will be supporting stopping child abuse. the first autistic miss american contestant also made history. online voters chose miss montana as a semifinalist, based on her contestant video. >> i thank you so much america for voting for me. i'm that much closer to becoming miss america. thank you so much. >> the winner who took home the crown, mallory hagan, receives a $50,000 college scholarship. miss south carolina, by the way, was the first runner-up. >>> tomorrow on abc7 good morning america, robin roberts has a big announcement sure to make you smile. good morning america begins tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. here on abc7. >> the golden globes are tonight. the awards have historically been a good indicator for the oscars. but there's a growing cont
such as the red cross. even the science fiction story. what we're dealing here really when you come down it the oil industry in familiar grew up in almost completely isolation and this is virtually a unique case. we have other places where oil industry have gone grown up and run by national oil companies. almost in every case, in fact in every case, the industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 19 20s rate on the oil industry was home grown and developed the own culture and civilization even as the soviet union did with the own language and culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that have a people who decided that capitalism didn't work. so it's though they are piled in to a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a different civilization which the market was thrown out in prices and private ownership and built that civilization and made it run for nearly six or seven decades, not well, but it ran. then they decided it wasn't
with venture capital money, offering classes in science, technology, engineering, and math. universities came on board, hoping to reach more students than they previously could, and to improve instruction both on and off campus using online technology. thrun says early results are promising. >> we have some data on how work for some of the classes, we've shown that the average point score of students taking those classes online is higher, significantly higher than taking it in the classroom. that's kind of mind-blowing. >> reporter: he says teachers are learning new strategies that are more effective than the traditional lecture. >> it's not my lecturing that changes the student, but it's the student exercise. so our courses feel very much like video games, where you're being bombarded with exercise after exercise. that's very different from the way i teach at stanford, where i'm much more in a lecturing mode. >> porter: at coursera, says online courses aren't dominated by a few aggressive students in a classroom. >> on the online web site, we have these things we call in- video quizzes, wher
than it appears, it's not rocket science? >> and not only maybe not rocket science but ends up being good. in texas, 6% unemployment and that is attributed to the energy boom. they allowed it to happen. on the federal level we are not allowing it to take place. in iowa they have a surplus and the fours they have an unemployment rate. so you can make people's lives better. it makes sense to people in a common sense level but in the federal area not so much. >> neil: i get a lot of e-mail. we had ron johnson on and got heated on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a surplus beca
equal more killing," science reporter elizabeth rosen hal refused the notion that armed security reduces gun violence. the research? she went to latin america and saw unsafe places had guards in restaurants and stuff. she concludes guards with guns mean more murder. this is a science reporter. as recent magazine notes like explaining the birds and bees to a teen, armed guards might be a response to high homicide rates rather than a cause of them. anyway, we have been here before. relativism which views good and bad behavior is relative, poisons all debate. using rosenthal's office we should disarm the military. clearly their guns lead to more war, i think. this is sometimes reporting. in the times, it makes me wish i were a liberal. then all i say is "x" is bad because "x" is bad. fracking, bad. got no evidence but it has to be bad. spending cuts, that kills grannies, you granny-killer. industry, they use smokestacks, i must do something to stop that. bain capital, even if i don't know what it is. tea party, racist, i have no evidence but c'mon, just look at them. benghazi, more deaths.
on the obama administration to build the star wars weapon. but on a posting the science and space advisor wrote the u.s. does not support blowing up planets. he also added why waste taxpayer money on a death star with the fundamental flaw that can be exploited by a one-man star ship? >>> there are questions about -- the new miss america 2013. >> your new miss america is miss new york! [applause] >> mallory hagen won the pageant last night. she tap danced to win the price. again the prize. she will be supporting stopping child abuse. the first autistic miss american contestant also made history. online voters chose miss montana as a semifinalist, based on her contestant video. >> i thank you so much america for voting for me. i'm that much closer to becoming miss america. thank you so much. >> alexis may have won the popular vote, but the overall winner, mallory hagan, receives a $50,000 college scholarship. miss south carolina, by the way, was the first runner-up. >>> tomorrow on abc7 good morning america, robin roberts has a big announcement sure to make you smile. good morning america against
colbert's mind last night. now neil, one of the most popular science writers of our time takes us for a wild ride through the universe here on "the cycle." >> you have said i'm related to a fish, right? >> oh, yeah. the challenge here is taking it to rocks and planets and stellar processes and the big bang. itsd the unity of all physical entities in the world. >> can you get me $5 worth of whatever it is? sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unu
think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
cross. this was profitable and, therefore, of interest. it's even a science fiction story, because what we're doing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry, in particular, grew up in almost complete isolation from the waste, and this is virtually a unique place. we have other places where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact, in every case, these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people that decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all piled into a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a completely different civ
in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education. state universities for example are being decimated. so if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth in the future? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word, invest became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about it in a fairly sophisticated manner. some in the government. some the private sector, each on their own and some jointly. that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
to the science and space technology program he was involved whether they will try to pick up some sort of new copyright enforcement has yet to be seen. >> host: did you see a policy coming forward again? >> whether there will be some sort of effort to have some kind of copyright law mind, i think it is a possibility. but i think a lot of lawmakers were a little frightened by the backlash for that. i think there is a movie industry and the recording industry is looking for smaller issues that they can push. >> host: lee terry is taking over for cliff stearns. on the energy and commerce committee, is that right? >> no, he is taking over the position that mary bono mack had and he will be the vice chair of the commerce committee. it will be interesting to see how and whether she tries to assert her authority. she has actually told me that she is interested in tackling something related to piracy. but i would agree that it's very unlikely. all members are extremely wary of trying to enact laws of technology that they perhaps have an expertise on. and that they don't understand all the ramificatio
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
to the program for international student assessment, the u.s. now ranks 14th in reading. 17th in science, and 25th in mathematics. that is not acceptable. those are not grades we want to put on the national refrigerator. the time for action is now. i want to thank delegate kirk thompson and the chairman of the all student campaign. they have created a number of proposals i will announce this year. it starts with the idea that great students and schools make great citizens. a great teacher, like my sister, makes all the difference in the world in the life of a young person. we need to recruit, retain, and reward excellent teachers, and then treat them like the professionals that they are. [applause] first i am proposing giving teachers their first state- supported pay raise since 2007, and my budget limits provide $58 million for a 2% pay raise. the education fairness act will streamline the bureaucratic grievance procedure to benefit both teachers and principals. we will extend the probationary period from three years to five years and require a satisfactory performance rating, as demonstrated t
wonderful co author who is a professor of political science and political philosophy at harvard many years ago when we were both at princeton university we taught a course on ethics and public policy and that led to lescol offering several books on the deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, president gutmann, you give to legislative examples, 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> this is a tale of two compromises, and it begins with ronald reagan's presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us that live through the years recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat and ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bill bradley and bob packwood being a part of the movers of this compromise. fast forward to the affordable care act it was arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent c
can schedule an update with our behavioral sciences unit. i know that we've had -- they came before us. i know the chief has augmented that unite significantly. but we want to hear from them and see how things are going. i know we've had some issues within the department recently and we want to address that. >> also dr. gayle martin will be 7 and at scottish rights temple on february 8. he gives a fabulous case on suicide prevention and the stresses on law enforcement. >> president mazzucco: we did receive that e-mail today and it's open to the commissioners if you want to attend. we had a very good meeting with mary dunnigan's group and if we can have kelly dunn present. these are issues that involved the community and the department so i would like an update on that. >> i second that getting an update from the behavioral science unit because i remember last year we worked on this and we had a couple of recommendations. the chief was very supportive and i'm curious about how all of the recommendations have panned out, how it's been implemented. i definitely feel very sad for the offic
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. queen mattresses start at just $699. and now save 50% on the closeout of our silver limited edition bed. ends sunday. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about, where we focus on reporting from the front line, and we begin with an "outfront" update to a story we've been following. the army investigating another case of abuse at an army day care center in ft. meyer, virginia. the army, according to a spokesman, was notified yesterday that a child care worker allegedly slapped a child. the incident was reported by another caregiver in the room. the alleged perpetrator
to in infrastructure. we're investing half as much in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education -- state universities, for example, are being decima decimated. if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word. it became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about a sophisticated manner. some government, some private sector, some on their own and some jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as
about this law, because critics say it damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, and preventing doctors from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. add advocates who support the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. the national rifle association somehow managed to put this stealth legislation into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how and why. and why, whatever you think of a law, one of the president's top allies, that's right, the president's ally, helped the nra get it passed. no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping 'em honest. >> when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that buried in the legislation's more than 900 pages was a gift to the nation's powerful gun lobby. but here it is. a provision entitled "protection of second amendment rights." it states the government and health insurers c
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so mr. corrie inhold as you may know is shutting down some these pot clubs operating for years because of all the social problems. in portugal they have legalized drugs and had a lot of problems there in zurich they had to stop that. what do you think about that. >> this is america and a free country. the voters of colorado have spoken and we want to treat marijuana like alcohol that was what amendment 64 is all about. it is much safer to treat it that way in a regulated fashion and that's what we are doing. there are hundreds of thousands of alcohol clubs all over america. we are just like those except marijuana. >> bill: i'm wondering about the safer comment. i used to live in denver as you know. everybody has a car. mass transit very minor there in colorado. they go to your club 64. you don't sell marijuana there but you allow them to use. sit sit around and have little snacks i'm sure you sell. then they have to leave and go home and they are ston
? >> the science would say that alcohol is more detrimental. >> bill: one beer, one glass of wine because there are blood alcohol levels that you have to obey. one beer, one glass of wine as opposed to smoking a marijuana cigarette which they are going to do in your club. you don't see any difference? >> i would say it's about the same. >> bill: about the same. okay. >> it is. >> bill: i don't think you are going to get a lot of flack on that statement. in los angeles, medical marijuana clinics more than 200 of them have been closed down in the state of california i should say. a lot of them in l.a. the reason is that authorities said around these clinics with drug dealers. okay? because people who are in the drug culture, ie marijuana, then are a little bit -- have a little bit more tendency to use other drugs and that was attracting the dealers. also something that you don't have to worry about because you are not selling drugs at club 64. buying selling it to children. that was a big problem as well. but the culture that is being created by this intoxicant, marijuana does holland, port
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. so it's not about keeping my dentures in, it's about keeping the food particles out. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're workinwith a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. >>> the u.s. military has a
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> our second story "outfront," football to blame. the national institutes of health says former nfl linebacker junior seau had a degenerative brain disease linked to multiple head traumas when he
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 383 (some duplicates have been removed)